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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> making news in america this morning. >> president obama gets ready to make his case for the u.s. role in libya. today's speech to the nation comes as libyan rebels go on the offensive. >>> japan rattled by another earthquake as the credibility gap widens in confusing statements about that criminalled nuclear plant. >>> and back here at h final four final four bound. virginia commonwealth gets ready for another wild week after another march madness stunner. >>> good morning. we begin with libya where rebel forces are advancing on the capital tripoli this morning. >> and there's an unconfirmed report they've already taken moammar gadhafi's hometown which is a government stronghold, the rebels are benefitting from they air strikes by the international coalition. >> and tonight, president obama tells the american people why the u.s. thread effort. abc's emily schmidt joins us with more. good morning. >> reporter: peggy and rob good morning to you. this is now day ten of the no-fly zone over libya. president obama plans to address the nation tonight about libya. he's expected to say
, whether the u.s. should help the rebels by providing them with weapons. emily schmidt has the latest. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. president obama says he is looking at all options to support the rebels. but when members of the international diplomatic community met in london and had a chance to talk about it, one member said the talk of arming rebels didn't come up. with nato set to take command of military operation, president obama says moammar gadhafi is feeling the pressure. >> the circle around gadhafi understands that the noose is tightening. their days are probably numbered. >> reporter: diplomats from more than three dozen countries met in london yesterday, to discuss libya in a potential post-gadhafi era. >> we must help people plan for their future after the conflict is over. >> reporter: but forces loyal to gadhafi are pushing back rebels from ground they just gained. diplomats say they did not discuss arming the rebels. though, the idea is up for debate. >> there could be a legitimate transfer of arms if i country would choose to do that. >> we are th
will speak to the nation tonight to further explain the u.s. mission in libya. good morning, everyone. it is monday, march 28th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. you're going to be driving the week today. >> i will be doing some of that. >> national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and msnbc political analyst pat buchanan in the studio here this morning. i love that. >> pat in the flesh. >> you're okay after that accident. >> i hope the other people are okay. >> it doesn't sound like it. hope everyone had a good weekend. i had another trip to the e.r. what else is new? >> oh, my. >> kids. we have a lot going on today. she's fine. thanks for asking. >> you're here. >> sprained ankle. no, not me. we have a lot going on today. we talk about the president's address to the nation tonight, how the libya mission plays into the obama doctrine. i think it does. also, in the 7:00 a.m. hour we'll bring in the executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine, eric bates. "rolling stone" is out with anothe
. >>> and more now on japan's nuclear crisis and concern about the risks from radiation. the u.s. embassy is urging people within 50 miles of the nuclear plant to evacuate. that's 1.9 million people. japanese officials have told those living within 12 to 19 miles to stay indoors. earlier, the government evacuated about 200,000 people living within a 12-mile radius. and of course the biggest risk is to workers inside the plant trying to avoid a meltdown. more from dr. begsanjay gupta. >>> an important piece of the puzzle, what are radiation levels inside the plant? we know the levels are higher inside where workers are trying to do their work. they try and protect themselves with this, a hazmat suit. they may use a mask that has a little respirator on it. these sort of things provide some help against some forms of radiation but not against the most dangerous forms of radiation like gamma radiation. there's also little sensors that they may use to find out how much radiation they're being exposed to or what the contamination is. these aren't protecting people as much as giving them in the
there are no shortages, just worries. the white house says it's considering of tapping into the 727 million barrels of u.s. strategic oil reserves. >> it's something done on rare occasions. >> the strategic oil reserve is there for emergencies. this is not an emergency. >> reporter: one oil analyst says there's political pressure. for the president to lower prices. >> he can say, i can do something, and you are better off. what elected official would not want to do that. >> reporter: in the meantime, the squeeze is on. >> it's hard to ask our customers for increases right now. so we really have to suck it up and that really hurts. >> reporter: leaving drivers and gas tanks with an increasingly empty feeling. some analysts say when gas gets above $4 a gallon demands prices drop. but in many parts of the country, $4 a gallon gas is now a reality. rob and peggy. >> emily, thanks a lot. >>> that unrest in the middle east shows no signs of slowing. in libya, rebel forces say they're going to regroup and bring in heavy weapons. this after a punishing weekend of air strikes by forces loyal to leader moammar gadh
for gadhafi, to get him into exile. well get into that with the u.s. bourd to the united nations, susan rice. >>> first, we go to jake tapper at the white house. >> reporter: good morning, george. the president said a confluence of events compelled the u.s. to act to stop a massacre. a moral and a strategic case to act. and broad support for reaction throughout the world. but, george, that did not stop the president's critics. the president said they were a special set of circumstances. >> the united states has worked with our international partners to mobilize a broad coalition, secure an international mandate to protect civilians, stop an advancing army, prevent a massacre and establish a no-fly zone. >> reporter: also clearly informing his decision were lessons from two previous presidents. why would the u.s. not militarily seek regime change in libya? >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> reporter: but also the responsibility to prevent a massacre, as did not happen in the former yugoslavia during bill clinton's tenure in 1995. >> as president, i refuse to wait for images of
confidence. they say u.s. power plants are safe. that may not be enough to ease public concerns. new polling last week found a sharp decline in the percentage of americans who support building new nuclear plants. so far, that fear has not spread to capitol hill. lawmakers are certainly raising concerns but nuclear energy still has bipartisan support. >> i'm not persuaded that nuclear power should be deleted from the list of options that we look at. >> i wouldn't, if i were the president, sign an executive order to freeze all construction of nuclear plants as the president froze all drilling in the gulf coast after that disaster down there. >> reporter: right now there are 104 nuclear reactors across the united states. these facilities account for just 20% of the nation's electricity. far less than countries like japan and france. nuclear power there makes up 70% of the total electrical output. and developing nations such as schin that and india are moving quickly to catch up. the chinese are currently building 100 reactors. last year president obama said the u.s. cannot afford to fall behind
our defense department knows how to do this but i think, you have to take out u.s. troops first before we can do anything. regional stability is extremely important and you have to bring in the region and talk about how you move forward. but that means our troops have to get out. and the cost, in addition the human costs, you look at the dollars, the trailians trailia- trillions of dollars and as longs war going on that isn't going to happen. >> charlie: you want legislation to cut off funding -- >> cut off funding for future operations in a began stan. i want funding there to protect the troops. anything they need, they performed well. they should be reported so whatever it takes to protect and support the troops we need to fund as well as the contractors. but we need to send this funding in and we need to do that and use the funding whatever we appropriate to begin withdrawing and we need to do that quickly. not in 2011 but we need to begin a massive drop down. >> charlie: what do you think of general gates. >> he's been very bold and he's made some statements and tried to help mo
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)